jewish-book-festival-events-day-2

FEATURED AUTHORS WCJ BOOK AWARDS

EVENTS BY DAY

Pre-fest  |   Sa Nov 25 Opening   |   Su Nov 26   |   Mo Nov 27   |   Tu Nov 28   |   We Nov 29   |   Th Nov 30


LUNCH & LEARN
INTRIGUE IN THE CARIBBEAN

Monday November 27  |  11:45am-1:15pm
DAVID LAYTON / The Dictator

SPONSORED BY BEVERLEY KORT & RAY SCHACHTER

CANCELLED

DAVID LAYTON
The Dictator is centred on a little-known historical event – the creation of an agricultural colony for Jewish refugees in the Dominican Republic by murderous dictator Rafael Trujillo during World War II. Layton’s story courses through the Anschluss in Vienna, a Swiss refugee camp and the details of this unexpected  and seemingly generous offer. Told from the alternating perspectives of Karl who is 90 and descending into dementia and his son Aaron, and travelling from present-day Toronto to the postwar settlement of Jewish immigrants in the Dominican Republic, The Dictator is at turns funny, poignant and insightful. With a deft touch and a wonderful ability to show the humorous in the tragic, David Layton has created a novel that explores the relationship between fathers and sons, and how the events of the past translate down through generations.

Award-winning writer DAVID LAYTON is the author of Motion Sickness, a memoir that was shortlisted for the Trillium Book Award, and the bestselling novel The Bird Factory. He teaches creative writing at the University of Toronto.

PRESENTED WITH THE JCC SENIORS DEPARTMENT


Outreach to Jewish day schools SPONSORED BY ESTHER CHETNER

Monday November 27 |  12:30–1:30pm
Richmond Jewish Day School Gr 6-7    FREE

IRENE N. WATTS / Seeking Refuge– A Graphic Novel
KATHRYN E. SHOEMAKER (illustrator)

SPONSORED BY HELEN PINSKY

WINNERS of the 2017 VINE AWARD FOR CANADIAN JEWISH LITERATURE

Seeking Refuge captures Irene Watts’ experiences when she was sent to England from Germany on the Kindertransport at the age of seven. This was a military operation that saved almost 10,000 Jewish children during WWII.

In the book, it is December 2, 1938 and the first Kindertransport  arrives in England from Berlin. Eleven-year-old Marianne Kohn is amongst the over 200 children on board. It is twenty-four hours since she said good-bye to her mother, she does not know if she will ever see her again. Her snobbish  English foster mother is unsympathetic to the young foreigner. World War II breaks out in September 1939, and Marianne is evacuated to South Wales. She must cope with new problems both in and out of school. However her hope and resilience are finally rewarded. Then as today,  the refugee experience takes its toll on those who flee their homes because of persecution.

“Author and illustrator show their collaborative finesse in a wonderfully rendered marriage between text and art. A book that invites close reading, this will spark interest in the plight of all refugees.”

IRENE N. WATTShas been a storyteller since the age of seven. She has written poems, plays, novels and non-fiction books. As a member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada, she wrote and directed plays for young audiences to be performed at schools.

KATHRYN E. SHOEMAKER is the illustrator of more than 40 books for children. She has broad experience as an art teacher, curriculum specialist, filmmaker, fund raiser and event designer. She teaches children’s literature at UBC.


YIDDISH STORIES - TEACHING YIDDISH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
Monday November 27  |  6:00-7:00pm
RACHEL MINES / Have I Got a Story for You

SPONSORED BY THE KIRMAN FOUNDATION FOR YIDDISH CULTURE

or by phone 604-257-5111   |   $16

RACHEL MINES is a Yiddish translator who teaches at Langara College. She was a Translation Fellow at the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA last year and is preparing a collection of the work of Jonah/Yoine Rosenfeld.

Starting from a reading of one of the Rosenfeld stories she translated for Have I Got a Story For You — the recent anthology of Yiddish stories originally published in The Forward, the most popular Yiddish daily in the US — Rachel will discuss some of the strategies she uses to teach Yiddish stories in (mostly) non-Jewish classes.

 

 


FOR TEENS - DYSTOPIAN REALITY
Monday November 27  |  6:30-7:30pm
ARI GOELMAN / The Innocence Treatment

FREE

Lauren has always been na├»ve. She has a disorder that makes her believe everything that everyone tells her—to the point that she often puts herself in danger. When she has the opportunity to have an operation to correct her disorder, she and her family are thrilled. Now Lauren can live a normal life. But after the surgery Lauren grows more and more paranoid, convinced that she’s part of a government conspiracy that only she can uncover. 

Told in journal entries and therapy session transcripts, The Innocence Treatment is a collection of Lauren’s papers, annotated by her sister long after the events of the novel. Some would call this book speculative fiction, but it could just as well be a shocking tell-all of genetic engineering and government secrets.

Vancouver author ARI GOELMAN is the author of the middle-grade novel The Path of Names, Winner of the Chocolate Lily Award (2014).


UNEXPECTED HOLOCAUST STORIES
Monday November 27  |  8:00-9:30pm
MAX WALLACE / In The Name Of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust 
DAVID LAYTON / The Dictator
MODERATOR: HELEN PINSKY

or by phone 604-257-5111   |   $18

MAX WALLACE  
In The Name Of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust draws on an explosive cache of recently declassified documents and an account from the only living eyewitness to unravel a previously unknown mystery.

Wallace  uncovers an astounding story involving the secret negotiations of an unlikely trio — a former fascist President of Switzerland, a courageous Orthodox Jewish woman, and Himmler’s Finnish osteopath — to end the Holocaust, aided by clandestine Swedish and American intelligence efforts. He documents their efforts to deceive Himmler, who, as Germany’s defeat loomed, sought to enter an alliance with the West against the Soviet Union.

MAX WALLACE is a Holocaust historian and a veteran interviewer for Steven Spielberg’s Shoah Foundation, as well as a New York Times bestselling author.

DAVID LAYTON
The Dictator is centred on a little-known historical event – the creation of an agricultural colony for Jewish refugees in the Dominican Republic by murderous dictator Rafael Trujillo during World War II. Layton’s story courses through the Anschluss in Vienna, a Swiss refugee camp and the details of this unexpected  and seemingly generous offer. Told from the alternating perspectives of Karl who is 90 and descending into dementia and his son Aaron, and travelling from present-day Toronto to the postwar settlement of Jewish immigrants in the Dominican Republic, The Dictator is at turns funny, poignant and insightful. With a deft touch and a wonderful ability to show the humorous in the tragic, David Layton has created a novel that explores the relationship between fathers and sons, and how the events of the past translate down through generations.

Award-winning writer DAVID LAYTON is the author of Motion Sickness, a memoir that was shortlisted for the Trillium Book Award, and the bestselling novel The Bird Factory. He teaches creative writing at the University of Toronto.